kickstand?

Just a silly question, but why are bikes sold without kickstands these days? I wasnt able to use the ropes set up in Ragbrai towns cuz I dont have drops. And it seems my tire wont fit in most racks I come across on trails. My hubby bought me a kickstand, best $6 ever spent!

55 Replies

Bobthebiker, June 22, 2011 at 8:43 am

I want to echo what Tony said, with another caveat. I recently watched a very sad hombre wheel an aluminum frame bike into the LBS with crumpled top tube – seems he had clamped his bike to the workstand on the top tube, rather than the seat post. The frame was toast. 

#19481

tiki, June 22, 2011 at 11:34 am

No offense there, but what did he clamp the tube with, jaws of life? And yet he was still able to bike into the LBS?

Steel is real, it is the miracle material of the future.

#19482

Tony, June 22, 2011 at 12:14 pm

The Seat post tube has thicker walls and is designed to clamp a seat post. The designers also know this is a clamp point for workstands. Besides the possible compression damage. A kick stand is always being kicked into place. It acts as a lever and the force from kicking it open is applied to the clamp.  weight is only an issue for the weight weenies. There is an issue with the kickstand being a snag point on off road bikes. If you seating on a bike with the kickstand down and roll backwards. You can crack or bend the frame. The cons really do out weigh the pros. If the mechanics and the design engineers no. They must have a good reason, right?

 A quick search on the Internet yield this.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/404952-why-are-there-no-kickstands-on-road-bicycles/

http://blog.centurycycles.com/2011/01/5-tips-kickstands-yes-or-no.html

http://www.ghost-bikes.com/2011/en/service/faq/#10

Besides the old school trick above. I do on occasion use a Topek Flash Stand.The bike is on a Flash Stand.  BTW same bike as above. After a recent rebuild.

#19483

Bartaped, June 22, 2011 at 1:07 pm

Surprised no one has mentioned this kickstand. it is a a stand that mounts on the rear stays.Personally i have a 2-legged kickstand on my touring bike. Not alot of fun not having a kickstandis not much fun.

Rearmount………. http://www.amazon.com/Greenfield-SKS2BC-Oversize-Carded-Kickstand/dp/B0030KZHP0

Double Kickstand……… http://www.amazon.com/Double-Kickstand-for-Heavy-Bikes/dp/B000AO9UGQ/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1308769649&sr=1-5

 

#19484

Miles, June 22, 2011 at 4:18 pm

Tony said: The Seat post tube has thicker walls and is designed to clamp a seat post. The designers also know this is a clamp point for workstands. Besides the possible compression damage. A kick stand is always being kicked into place. It acts as a lever and the force from kicking it open is applied to the clamp.  weight is only an issue for the weight weenies. There is an issue with the kickstand being a snag point on off road bikes. If you seating on a bike with the kickstand down and roll backwards. You can crack or bend the frame. The cons really do out weigh the pros. If the mechanics and the design engineers no. They must have a good reason, right?  A quick search on the Internet yield this. http://www.livestrong.com/article/404952-why-are-there-no-kickstands-on-road-bicycles/ http://blog.centurycycles.com/2011/01/5-tips-kickstands-yes-or-no.html http://www.ghost-bikes.com/2011/en/service/faq/#10 Besides the old school trick above. I do on occasion use a Topek Flash Stand.The bike is on a Flash Stand.  BTW same bike as above. After a recent rebuild.
————————————————————————————– 
Looks like a powdercoat on that old Trek.
Looks good.

#19485

Tony, June 22, 2011 at 4:52 pm

Yes it is a powder coat. Its charcoal gray with blue metal flake. In sun light it swirls blue and purple. I also had a clear top coat added. It was done by J & C Premier Concepts in Port Byron, IL. Jim does beautiful work. His work is well known in the drag racing and custom car and bike communities. He also does Standard Byke frames. I will be riding RAGBRAI with this bike. I wish a photo would show the the quality of his work. You have to see it to appreciate it.

#19486

Phil1961, June 22, 2011 at 6:50 pm

I recently just acquired the “click-stand” for my trek madone 5.2, I bought it for Ragbrai this year so my seat isnt upside down and all wet in the morning. It fits nicely in my bag under my seat and is surprisingly light weight and quality built.

#19487

tiki, June 24, 2011 at 3:03 am

Just saying, if a bike frame can’t handle a kickstand, it isn’t safe riding.

#19488

KittySlayer, June 24, 2011 at 6:36 am

tiki said: I would never ride a frame that would be suspect due to a kickstand…
,,,do you trust it going downhill at 40mph?
…a kickstand is too heavy to carry on the bike.
…Steel is real, it is the miracle material of the future.

Just saying, if a bike frame can’t handle a kickstand, it isn’t safe riding.

I see you failed yet another year at engineering school. Fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life son.

While the choice of a bike that is designed to handle a kickstand is to be considered at the time of purchase the fact that a bike is not designed for a kickstand does not make it unsafe. It simply means it was designed for a different use (like riding). If you were a dedicated touring rider (other than one week a year) your choice might be different.

My wife, son and I each ride thousands of miles a year on bikes that are not designed to have kickstands installed. We will fly down hills well over 50mph  and the bikes are rock solid descenders. The bikes corner at speed as if on rails and can bunny hop over road hazards and land safely. The choice of a kickstand is based on need rather than weight.

Steel bikes are great, my son and I both race them. Coming from a BMX background he does amazing things on his road and track bike and has never had a frame fail because of riding be it steel, aluminum, titanium or carbon. Just because you can’t wrap your mind around the fact that materials other than steel can be designed to build safe, long lasting bikes does not make these other materials unsafe.

Sorry if this comes off a little harsh Tiki but a lot of novice cyclist read these forums to gather knowledge and your repeated post of inaccurate information is confusing.

#19489

benherr, June 24, 2011 at 7:33 am

On the other side of the spectrum, you have these “el cheapo” bikes (Wal Mart, etc.), made of super heavy steel that are pieces of crap. They are poorly designed and manufactured. I’ve seen head tubes break on “Little Puddin” bikes. And they have your kickstand on them. Just because a bike has a kickstand doesn’t neccessarily mean it’s a stronger/better bike.

#19490

tiki, June 24, 2011 at 11:42 am

Whatever there “Kitty Slayer”. When I bought my steel Bianchi in 99, the store owner refused to put a kickstand on it, stated they didn’t carry them and to put a kickstand on a Bianchi was a sin. So I bought one myself and put it on and about 25k miles later, it works flawlessly and will outlast any carbon bike and steel can be recycled, something carbon can’t be. BTW, how many 20yr old carbon bikes you see, I mean actually see on the road, not some pics Tony or BB can drum up. Look on Rag this year, oldest carbon you will see is about 5yrs or less.

Keepin’ it real with steel and kickstands.

Peace out.

#19491

mclousing, June 24, 2011 at 1:16 pm

tiki, not 20 years but my 97 Trek Y50 OCLV mountain bike is still kickin with the best of them.  Your logic that steel is better than carbon is close minded.  Each material has its benefits and flaws.  BTW I agree with the shop owner putting a kickstand on any true road bike is a sin.  There really is no need for it.  And yes I am over 60 LBS over weight, and I really could care less about the weight of any  item on my bike.  I use one of my road bikes for commuting to work and other odd errands and never had an issue with no kickstand.  If you choose to put one on it is your own choice, but the logic that you are using is misleading and ill advised.

#19492

tiki, June 24, 2011 at 1:41 pm

No offense there sir but a bike sitting idle for most of the year doesn’t make the bike’s age a reliable indicator of durability.

Face it, with carbon a slight ding and you need to all but have it put under a microscope and do forensic inspection for fear of failure at any time without warning.

Steel on the other hand lugs on and on, pun intended. You can see cheap Huffy bikes from the 60s with more rust than paint, including the wheels, handlebars, and cranks. They still work…

Last year saw a pileup in a paceline and when all the dust settled, only a few scratches on the riders, and of the 7 or so bikes, the only ones banged up was a Trek Madone with a broken top tube and another carbon, a Giant with a huge gash in the fork that the guy was leary of riding but had little choice to get back home.

Just saying, and I need not lean my bike down to run in the store.

#19493

Tony, June 24, 2011 at 2:47 pm

I ride a 1987 Centurion Lemans RS made of Tanga II and mangaloy fork. The Trek is a 1999 2100 Alpha aluminum frame with carbon fork. The Orbea I ride is 2006 Vuelta with 7006 aluminum frame with Zeus carbon fork and seat stays. I am over weight. These bikes handle it just fine. A testament really to there quality craftsmanship. Stock wheels do not handle my weight. Thats why I have custom wheels, Mavic, and Rolf. I prefer to follow guide lines from the engineers and techs. It keeps me on top of the bike and not on the pavement. Taking care of those bikes is just as important to making them last. As far as drum up pics. Enough riders on this forum over the years have seen my bikes rolling with me on them to know they  are real. I post information on here because I know newbies are looking for help. Even if they don’t post. I for years was one of them. I got a vast wealth of info from this forum and others. Especial the bike mechanic forums for learning how to correctly rebuild and maintain bikes. I post on here more to pay it forward. I will be rolling on my Trek 2100 this year. With the custom wheels and powder coat it will be a one of a kind bike on the ride. I might bring along the Centurion too. BTW if you see one of my bikes parked it wont be on a kickstand.

#19494

KittySlayer, June 24, 2011 at 3:15 pm

tiki said: Whatever there “Kitty Slayer”. When I bought my steel Bianchi in 99…

BTW, how many 20yr old carbon bikes you see, I mean actually see on the road…

Face it, with carbon a slight ding and you need to all but have it put under a microscope and do forensic inspection for fear of failure at any time without warning.

You can see cheap Huffy bikes from the 60s with more rust than paint, including the wheels, handlebars, and cranks. They still work….

Tiki, there is nothing wrong with being a curmudgeon and sticking with old stuff but there is no need to be a d!ck about it. Your opinions are simply that, opinions and have little to do with real facts.

Bianchi stopped building high end steel bikes in their Reporto Corse department after 1996 when they switched to aluminum and later to carbon fibre. So the 1999 steel Bianchi you bought was a mid range frame at best built from heavier steel tubes that would survive your use of a kickstand. My 1996 steel Bianchi was designed with tubes for racing and I still roll up at the start line with it but would never put a kickstand on it as it was not designed with tubing to handle the stressors that a kickstand creates.

There are three riders that show up on our club rides on 20+ year old carbon bikes. These are typically the oldest bikes on our rides and they perform as well as any other bikes new and old irrespective of materials. None of them have kickstands as if that really matters since everyone there is riding their bikes not parking them.

Carbon is extremely strong when used in the way it was designed for. Heck they use cabon fiber when making fighter jets. Since you like the one off anecdotes that dont really prove a point my son got TBoned by a car hard enough to bend the crankarm, trash both wheels and do $2,500 of damage to the car but the carbon fiber bike frame was still in perfect shape.

Well you still see rusted out pick up trucks on the farm from the 60’s but you sure would not want to take a family vacation across the country in one. No way anyone would enjoy riding a 40 year old Huffy across Iowa more than a current bike designed for this type of ride. Just because something is old does not mean it is better.

For folks looking for facts this is not the thread to find them in. Turtlemom – enjoy your kickstand, sounds like a good solution for your needs and works on your bike.

#19495

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